Writing 12 books in 12 months (easy, right?)

my brilliant career Writing 12 books in 12 months (easy, right?)
My Brilliant Career

I like goals.

They make it easier to focus where your attention needs to be.

Two months ago, I made myself a goal to write one new book every month.

So far, so good. Both August & September’s books are live, and I’m about to start October’s book. I’m actually ahead of schedule, which means I have time to write a blog post here. icon wink Writing 12 books in 12 months (easy, right?)

But is it enough?

So far, both books have been novella length (15,000-20,000 words). I am considering to changing that to novel length (50,000+) if I can figure out how to fit that many words into my monthly schedule. (Hey, other author’s seem to have no problem – I don’t need a life – right?)

I’ve priced them @ $2.99 so my royalty is roughly $2 each.

If I do write the novels they will be higher (although what price, I’m not sure – I’m currently experimenting with pricing).

But for arguments sake, let’s say I continue with the novella’s since I know I’m able to get one of those out per month easily enough.

My average sales so far (although they both haven’t been live for very long yet) is only fifteen sales per month (I only have Amz figures – not other retailers yet).

This means I’m ¬†adding an extra $30 or so per month per book.¬†It’ll probably be higher once all other retailers report, but let’s err on the conservative side for a moment.

If averages stay constant, after twelve months and twelve books that means I’ve added $360 per month to my balance sheet (12 x $30) or $4,320 per year (after the first year).

Doesn’t sound much does it?

But let’s say I never write another word, and the averages remain.

Over five years I’ll make $21,600.

Over ten – $43,200.

In ten years, each novella (again sticking with averages) will have made approx $3,600 each. Not bad for about 30 hours work (which is about how long the novellas are taking me to write and edit).

Now of course, this is making a lot of assumptions. Including that they continue to sell the same amount month after month, that indie royalties stay the same, and so on. Which of course is ridiculous because we have no idea what will happen one, five, ten years from now. It could be better, it could be worse. We don’t know.

I also don’t know what I will do. I might write a hit, I might never write or sell anything again. Or I might completely change my mind and write a novel a month instead of the novella’s (this is a strong possibility as I’ve already mentioned above).

But even though I don’t know, doesn’t mean I’m going to stop putting out a book each month. That would be crazy. (And I couldn’t bare not meeting my goal – icon smile Writing 12 books in 12 months (easy, right?) )

Besides, each story is better than the last as I learn about storytelling, cliffhangers, openings, pacing, characterisation, genre tropes, etc etc. Each of which you learn BY WRITING (and reading/studying of course).

Maybe at the end of the year, I might actually be good enough to sell more than 15 a month icon wink Writing 12 books in 12 months (easy, right?)

I’ll know by the end of the year.

Let’s find out …

 

Comments

  1. says

    Hi Tracey, Great blog! That’s quite a challenge, to write a book a month. I’d say it would be easier for non-fiction than for fiction. As for pricing the fiction, lots of genre fiction authors have discovered that the fiction books actually sell for less on Amazon than the NF books do. There are so many books there now, the competition is fierce, and with so many free books being offered, it makes it more difficult. I wish it wasn’t the case. One good thing, if you have more books on there, one helps sell the next. :-)

    • Tracey says

      Thanks Bobbi,

      If I don’t think about it as one big whole, and just think about writing the next book and then the next, it makes it seem less daunting ;)

      Tracey :)

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